It’s that bittersweet time of year when all of the adorable little chicks we’ve been watching since they were eggs are all grown up and about to leave us.  We’re thrilled to see so many well fed, happy, fully feathered chicks about to fledge! The little pufflings will soon leave their nests in the middle of the night, hop down the rocks and venture out to sea for the next 2 to 3 years before they hopefully return back to Seal to rear chicks of their own. 

The arctic tern chicks are preparing to follow their parents on a great migration to Antarctica where the next two years will be spent growing up and preparing for the long solo flight back to their birthplace with the goal of beginning a new family.

Once the guillemot chicks fledge they will move out onto the water but do not have to migrate long distances.  This means we can continue to observe some of our fledgers floating around all winter long!

 -Nicole Passeri, Seal Island research assistant

Image 1: Puffin fledger

Image 2: Common tern fledger

Image 3: Black guillemot fledger

Posted 5 hours ago

1 Notes

Two days ago, I had the awesome experience of grubbing out my first puffin chick from deep inside a burrow that I had to wiggle half of my body into, and banding him. To see how big these chicks have gotten is astonishing, and watching them grow their first real feathers gives me great hope that they will return to the island as breeding adults for many years to come. We have also grubbed out a few adults, for the purpose of measuring them as well as taking off, or putting on, geolocators (as you can see co-supervisors Ed and Julia doing below). These tiny data-recording devices, once removed from the ankles of the puffins, will hopefully tell us all about where the individuals have traveled throughout the year. It is surely exciting to be at the forefront of such important research, not to mention being able to work with these adorable pelagic birds up close. Meanwhile, we had a friendly visit from two members of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service yesterday, who came to collect data from the tower they had installed to track our Common and Arctic terns. Hopefully, the towers they have been installing on islands all over the Gulf of Maine will receive lots of data transmitted from radio tags we put on our terns several weeks ago, so we can track how far out they have been flying to find fish. As exciting as it is to know how far our puffins and terns have been traveling around the world, it definitely adds a sense of loneliness to our little island, as it certainly feels as though we have been with these birds every step of the way through a very important phase in their life cycle. To the future interns and volunteers of Seal Island, if you come across the birds we have banded this summer while you are here, tell them they will always be in our hearts.
-Max Feldman, Seal Island Research Assistant

Two days ago, I had the awesome experience of grubbing out my first puffin chick from deep inside a burrow that I had to wiggle half of my body into, and banding him. To see how big these chicks have gotten is astonishing, and watching them grow their first real feathers gives me great hope that they will return to the island as breeding adults for many years to come. We have also grubbed out a few adults, for the purpose of measuring them as well as taking off, or putting on, geolocators (as you can see co-supervisors Ed and Julia doing below). These tiny data-recording devices, once removed from the ankles of the puffins, will hopefully tell us all about where the individuals have traveled throughout the year. It is surely exciting to be at the forefront of such important research, not to mention being able to work with these adorable pelagic birds up close. Meanwhile, we had a friendly visit from two members of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service yesterday, who came to collect data from the tower they had installed to track our Common and Arctic terns. Hopefully, the towers they have been installing on islands all over the Gulf of Maine will receive lots of data transmitted from radio tags we put on our terns several weeks ago, so we can track how far out they have been flying to find fish. As exciting as it is to know how far our puffins and terns have been traveling around the world, it definitely adds a sense of loneliness to our little island, as it certainly feels as though we have been with these birds every step of the way through a very important phase in their life cycle. To the future interns and volunteers of Seal Island, if you come across the birds we have banded this summer while you are here, tell them they will always be in our hearts.

-Max Feldman, Seal Island Research Assistant

Posted 1 day ago

2 Notes

Here are some of the birds that visit the open ocean around Seal Island in late summer. All are great travelers and have covered vast distances to feed on the abundance of food in the Gulf of Maine.

Clockwise from top –

Great shearwater a visitor from the South Atlantic.

Cory’s shearwater, a visitor from the Eastern Atlantic.

Red phalarope, a visitor from the Arctic tundra.

Wilson’s storm-petrel, a visitor from the Southern Ocean.

- Ed Jenkins, Seal Island Research Supervisor

Here are some of the birds that visit the open ocean around Seal Island in late summer. All are great travelers and have covered vast distances to feed on the abundance of food in the Gulf of Maine.

Clockwise from top –

Great shearwater a visitor from the South Atlantic.

Cory’s shearwater, a visitor from the Eastern Atlantic.

Red phalarope, a visitor from the Arctic tundra.

Wilson’s storm-petrel, a visitor from the Southern Ocean.

- Ed Jenkins, Seal Island Research Supervisor

Posted 4 days ago

5 Notes

A few days ago, we were in the puffin colony “grubbing” for puffin chicks, i.e. squishing our bodies into uncomfortable positions between rocks to get chicks out of their burrows in order to put shiny metal bands on their legs. While we were grubbing, we had a chance encounter with one of the adult puffins from the burrow cam burrow, so we took the opportunity to band one of Pal’s parents. We put a band on each leg, one is a BBL (Bird Banding Laboratory) band, with a unique nine digit number, kind of like a social security number, the other is a field-readable band with two letters and two numbers. These bands will allow us to identify the bird out in the field. We also took measurements of the bird, including wing length, weight, and some bill measurements, which provide useful data on the fitness of the bird.

Images: This is what Pal’s parent looks like up close
-Julia Gulka, Seal Island Research Supervisor

A few days ago, we were in the puffin colony “grubbing” for puffin chicks, i.e. squishing our bodies into uncomfortable positions between rocks to get chicks out of their burrows in order to put shiny metal bands on their legs. While we were grubbing, we had a chance encounter with one of the adult puffins from the burrow cam burrow, so we took the opportunity to band one of Pal’s parents. We put a band on each leg, one is a BBL (Bird Banding Laboratory) band, with a unique nine digit number, kind of like a social security number, the other is a field-readable band with two letters and two numbers. These bands will allow us to identify the bird out in the field. We also took measurements of the bird, including wing length, weight, and some bill measurements, which provide useful data on the fitness of the bird.

Images: This is what Pal’s parent looks like up close

-Julia Gulka, Seal Island Research Supervisor

Posted 1 week ago

5 Notes

These two pictures bring to light some major problems we see regularly as field researchers.  Negative human impact on our beautiful seabirds is a real and ever present danger these creatures face.  If/when we can step in to intervene on such horrors, we do, but more often than not the birds will not allow us close enough to help which was the case with this unfortunate puffin that got entangled in the balloon string.  The second picture I took while doing a puffin feeding study and didn’t notice the hook at the very end of the beak until I was reviewing the pictures later.  Knowing that beak full of fish was intended for an adorable puffling broke our hearts.  If this grim post can succeed in helping us to learn and spread the word about not littering, being vigilant about cleaning up our waste, not purchasing harmful objects (like balloons) that do not biodegrade and end up weekly on the shores of our island and generally attempting to reduce our impact on the planet, than it is worth it.  Please help us to spread the word and take positive steps toward helping the earth that does so much for us, and the animals we all hold dear.

-Nicole Passeri, Seal Island Research Assistant

Posted 1 week ago

5 Notes